Ulcerative Colitis Studies
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Ulcerative Colitis Studies

Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is a disease characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the inner lining of the colon and rectum. Symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, cramping, and an urgent need to have a bowel movement. Patients with UC typically have lower amounts of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, or good bacteria, in their gut compared with normal individuals.

Ulcerative Colitis in Children

Children with moderate to severe UC were divided into 2 groups and followed for 1 year. To get the children into remission they were given either 4 weeks of steroid therapy alone or 4 weeks of steroid therapy with VSL#3. The addition of VSL#3 to steroid therapy was found to dramatically increase the number of patients achieving remission.


Ulcerative Colitis Studies

Adapted from Miele et al: 2009


Once the children were in remission, then maintenance therapy was 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) for 1 year, again with or without VSL#3. The following chart shows that the addition of VSL#3 had a very beneficial effect.


Ulcerative Colitis Studies

Adapted from Miele et al: 2009


The children took the VSL#3 once a day and the dosage was dependent on their age and weight.

Active Ulcerative Colitis

A recent study found that 77% of the patients with mild to moderate ulcerative colitis, not responding to conventional therapy, had a positive response to VSL#3® with no adverse events.

Active Ulcerative Colitis

Images used with permission from Dr. Richard N. Fedorak, M.D., University of Alberta
Adapted from Bibiloni et al 2005

 

Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

In a study involving UC patients intolerant or allergic to 5-ASA who were in remission, 75% of patients had a positive response to VSL#3® administered for 12 months.

Original Articles of VSL#3® for the care of patients with UC

Tursi A et al: Med Sci Monit 2004;10:PI126-131.
Bibiloni R et al: Am J Gastroenterology 2005;100:1-8.
Venturi A et al: Ailment Pharmacol Ther 1999; 13:1103-1108.
Miele et al: Am J of Gastro 2009;104(2): 437-443.

vsl#3 results